Posts of Blood: Faust: Love of the Damned


Every once an awhile a movie comes out that is so bad, it’s good. Faust is one of those movies. While it is based off a comic series, the movie captures the essence. Shockingly the graphics for the film were very good. Given the budget and period of time this movie came out.

Now be forewarned in this movie and comics. There is a of violence and gore, a long with nudity.

I remember finding this movie, while I was looking for more movies with the actor from Wish Master. Reading the back and going what the hell!? Okay I’ll rent it. Yes rent.. Blockbuster was still a thing back then. At the time I wasn’t aware that it had been a comic series for a number of years before. So I jumped blindly into this weird world.

While the movie isn’t the greatest. But I love bad movies and this is easily in my top 10. It’s corny, cheesy, violent, gore, sexy fun. Definitely turn your brain off while watching it hahaha and don’t over think it.

Faust: Love of the Damned is a 2000 American English-language Spanish superhero horror film directed by Brian Yuzna. It is adapted from a screenplay by David Quinn and Miguel Tejada-Flores based on the comic book of the same name by Tim Vigil and David Quinn. It was produced by Ted Chalmers, Carlos, Julio and Antonio Fernández, Bea Morillas, Miguel Torrente and Brian Yuzna. It premiered at the Sitges International Fantastic Film Festival on 12 October 2000.

Original comic book series.

Faust is the lead superhero character and title of a collective series of comic books by Tim Vigil (art) and playwright David Quinn (stories), released by American publishers Northstar Comics, Caliber Comics, Avatar Press, and principally by Vigil and Quinn’s own Rebel Studios.

Alongside fellow graphic novels like the Watchmen, The Crow, and The Dark Knight Returns, Faust was credited with popularizing the “deconstructed superheroes” genre and the notion “comics aren’t just for kids.” One of the bestselling independent comics of the era, Faust issue 1 sold over 100,000 copies with later issues averaging 50,000 sales per issue, most of which sold through several printings and editions.

The series featured strong graphic violence and sexual situations. The main series is known as “Faust: Love Of The Damned” and started publishing in 1987, with new issues being published irregularly, roughly once a year, or sometimes every two years. David Quinn completed a script in 1996 (when writing the proposal to sell the film). The gap between issues grew wider with time. Issue 13 was published in 2005. It then took seven years for the authors to deliver the two last issues, 14 and 15, which concluded the story 25 years after the first episode.

The comic book series Faust: Love Of The Damned was banned in Canada and England.

It has been widely theorized that the mainstream comic book series Spawn, which debuted in 1992, was directly inspired by Faust. Spawn creator Todd McFarlane has stated publicly that he remembers Tim Vigil’s work “from way back – he’s definitely got talent.”

Information sources:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faust:_Love_of_the_Damned

“Just an outbreak of chaos” — Faust: Love of the Damned

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