Middle Earth Challenge: The Silmarillion

by J.R.R. Tolkien

The Silmarillion is Tolkien’s first book and his last. Long preceding in its origins The Lord of the Rings, it is the story of the First Age of Tolkien’s world, the andcient drama to which characters in the Lord of the Rings look back, and in which some of them, such as Elrond and Galadriel, took part. The Silmarillion was begun in 1917, and Tolkien worked on it, changed it, and enlarged it throughout his life. Edited by his son, Christopher Tolkien, the book finally appeared four years after the author’s death.

Now this novel out of all the Tolkien’s novels, I was worried the most about. I’ve tried reading it in the past a number of times and never could make. For the life of me I couldn’t figure out why. I love Tolkien and the Middle Earth. But I just could not make it through this novel. Then I realized I need to tae it on like a history book and not a adventure/epic story novel. While yes it is a story and there are MANY stories through out this book, it does not read that way. I had to approach it like I did for the History of the Lord of the Rings or the first part of The Lord of the Rings. In fact is also like reading a ancient scroll or even a Bible of the Middle Earth at points.

The Silmarillion is the source for the First Age of the Middle Earth and the downfall of the Kingdom of Númenor. It is composed of five different parts:

  • The Ainulindalë – Creation of Eä (Tolkien’s universe), the Timeless Halls, and Ainur by Eru Ilúvatar and the corruption of Melkor
  • The Valaquenta – Description of the Valar and Maiar, the supernatural beings.
  • The Quenta Silmarillion – Events before & during the First Age, which is the bulk of the collection
  • The Akallabêth – The history of the Second Age
  • The Rings of Power and the Third Age

If you take the The History of Middle Earth and Unfinished Tales, with The Silmarillion you get more of the narrative of the universe that Tolkien was trying to express in the The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings. Within’ this novel there is also 4 Great Tales that were summarized:

  • “Of Beren and Lúthien”
  • “Of Túrin Turambar”
  • “Of Tuor and the Fall of Gondolin”
  • “Of the Voyage of Eärendil and the War of Wrath”

Now Tolkien’s son Christopher Tolkien finished putting together Middle Earth Challenge: The Fall of Gondolin, Middle Earth Challenge: Beren and Lúthien, Middle Earth Challenge: The Children of Húrin. You can follow the link to find out more details about them. But those stories definitely expanded more on the The Silmarillion adn the history of the First, Second Age of the Middle Earth. Now from what I gathered, Christopher Tolkien had some problems with The Silmarillion material. Mostly caused by Guy Kay who helped Tolkien’s son put this together. Stating:

“This story was not lightly or easily conceived, but was the outcome of long experimentation among alternative conceptions. In this work Guy Kay took a major part, and the chapter that I finally wrote owes much to my discussions with him. It is, and was, obvious that a step was being taken of a different order from any other ‘manipulation’ of my father’s own writing in the course of the book: even in the case of the story of The Fall of Gondolin, to which my father had never returned, something could be contrived without introducing radical changes in the narrative. It seemed at that time that there were elements inherent in the story of the Ruin of Doriath as it stood that were radically incompatible with ‘The Silmarillion’ as projected, and that there was here an inescapable choice: either to abandon that conception, or else to alter the story. I think now that this was a mistaken view, and that the undoubted difficulties could have been, and should have been, surmounted without so far overstepping the bounds of the editorial function. ‘Apart from a few matters of detail in texts and notes that have not been published, all that my father ever wrote on the subject of the ruin of Doriath has now been set out (…) If these materials are compared with the story told in The Silmarillion it is seen at once that this latter is fundamentally changed, to a form for which in certain essential features there is no authority whatever in my father’s own writings.”

In the later books that I list above, Christopher would go back and introduced the details his Father planned on. There were a number of other issues that Christopher had, like the slaying of Thingol(High King of the Teleri). Again Christopher like to blame Guy Kay… At this point I’m growing tired of Christopher Tolkien. Don’t get me wrong, I am grateful for the work he has done. But there comes a point where you need to stop riding your Father’s coattails and blaming other people. If there questions or something didn’t set right with the Silmarillion, why publish it? Why wait year down the road, let everyone think one thing about the Middle Earth history. It’s just not the books, it’s everything dealing with the Middle Earth universe. Sorry, after reading and writing about this for a couple of months now. I’m starting to see a patter with Christopher Tolkien and his selfish/possessive behavior or dare I say holier than thou? Yes, yes I do..

But at any rate, back to the slaying of Thingol.. Christopher had this to say:

“In the story that appears in The Silmarillion the outlaws who went with Hurin to Nargothrond were removed, as also was the curse of Mîm; and the only treasure that Húrin took from Nargothrond was the Nauglamîr – which was here supposed to have been made by Dwarves for Finrod Felagund, and to have been the most prized by him of all the hoard of Nargothrond. Húrin was represented as being at last freed from the delusions inspired by Morgoth in his encounter with Melian in Menegroth. The Dwarves who set the Silmaril in the Nauglamîr were already in Menegroth engaged on other works, and it was they who slew Thingol; at that time Melian’s power was with-drawn from Neldoreth and Region, and she vanished out of Middle-earth, leaving Doriath unprotected. The ambush and destruction of the Dwarves at Sarn Athrad was given again to Beren and the Green Elves [following my father’s letter of 1963 quoted on p. 353, where however he said that ‘Beren had no army’] and from the same source the Ents, ‘Shepherds of the Trees’, were introduced.”

The game Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor, a story of a ranger leading a garrison on the Black Gate is killed along with his family, shortly after he is revived and a wraith Celebrimbor takes host in his once dead body. As told in the last section of The Silmarillion, Celebrimbor is killed after protecting his forged rings of power from Sauron. These two sharing a body both seek revenge and redemption.

This is a vary important novel to have with LOTR & the Hobbit. I would also pick up the other three novels I listed earlier. they stories are fantastic.

Middle Earth Challenge: The Return of the Shadow

Middle Earth Challenge

15351In this sixth volume of The History of Middle-earth the story reaches The Lord of the Rings. In The Return of the Shadow (an abandoned title for the first volume) Christopher Tolkien describes, with full citation of the earliest notes, outline plans, and narrative drafts, the intricate evolution of The Fellowship of the Ring and the gradual emergence of the conceptions that transformed what J.R.R. Tolkien for long believed would be a far shorter book, ‘a sequel to The Hobbit’. The enlargement of Bilbo’s ‘magic ring’ into the supremely potent and dangerous Ruling Ring of the Dark Lord is traced and the precise moment is seen when, in an astonishing and unforeseen leap in the earliest narrative, a Black Rider first rode into the Shire, his significance still unknown. The character of the hobbit called Trotter (afterwards Strider or Aragorn) is developed while his indentity remains an absolute puzzle, and the suspicion only very slowly becomes certainty that he must after all be a Man. The hobbits, Frodo’s companions, undergo intricate permutations of name and personality, and other major figures appear in strange modes: a sinister Treebeard, in league with the Enemy, a ferocious and malevolent Farmer Maggot.

The story in this book ends at the point where J.R.R. Tolkien halted in the story for a long time, as the Company of the Ring, still lacking Legolas and Gimli, stood before the tomb of Balin in the Mines of Moria. The Return of the Shadow is illustrated with reproductions of the first maps and notable pages from the earliest manuscripts.

The Return of the Shadow: The History of The Lord of the Rings, Part One

(The History of Middle-Earth #6)

by J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (Editor)

I now I would admit when I first got this book (that was in high school, so…..18-19 years ago.. ewwww), I was MASSIVELY  disappointed. At the time I was coming off LOTR and wanted more Tolkien. Not realizing what this book actually was and that was basically a history book of Middle Earth and the early drafts into LOTR. Fast forward to today, I have a much more appreciation for the book, well the series over all.

It was interesting to see the evolution of the characters, notably Aragorn! The earliest unpublished versions of LOTR, Aragorn was called Trotter rather than Strider and was a Hobbit instead of Man. The name was derived from his wooden feet. Yes… Wooden feet.. Trotter/Aragorn got them after being tortured in Mordor. There is a great deal more information of Trotter and is explained in The History of Middle-earth, volume IX, Sauron Defeated.

HobbitWhile this book & series did help with my understanding of Middle Earth and in the Challenge. They are rather boring at times, and come off as special edition Christopher Tolkien commentary of his father’s work. Dare I say almost a cash grab??? I really think where Christopher really shined was in the first age with The Great Tales. Those being The Children of Húrin in 2007, Beren and Lúthien in 2017, and The Fall of Gondolin in 2018. I really enjoyed those novels and I am glad Christopher went a head and wrote out The Fall of Gondolin.  He wasn’t originally going to do that. But at any rate, if you are a big Tolkien fan I would say you should check these works. If not, stay away from them hahaha.

“I wish it need not have happened in my time,” said Frodo.
“So do I,” said Gandalf, “and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

 

Middle Earth Challenge: The Fall of Gondolin

Middle Earth Challenge

39798828._SY475_In the Tale of The Fall of Gondolin are two of the greatest powers in the world. There is Morgoth of the uttermost evil, unseen in this story but ruling over a vast military power from his fortress of Angband. Deeply opposed to Morgoth is Ulmo, second in might only to Manwë, chief of the Valar: he is called the Lord of Waters, of all seas, lakes, and rivers under the sky. But he works in secret in Middle-earth to support the Noldor, the kindred of the Elves among whom were numbered Húrin and Túrin Turambar.

Central to this enmity of the gods is the city of Gondolin, beautiful but undiscoverable. It was built and peopled by Noldorin Elves who, when they dwelt in Valinor, the land of the gods, rebelled against their rule and fled to Middle-earth. Turgon King of Gondolin is hated and feared above all his enemies by Morgoth, who seeks in vain to discover the marvellously hidden city, while the gods in Valinor in heated debate largely refuse to intervene in support of Ulmo’s desires and designs.

Into this world comes Tuor, cousin of Túrin, the instrument of Ulmo’s designs. Guided unseen by him Tuor sets out from the land of his birth on the fearful journey to Gondolin, and in one of the most arresting moments in the history of Middle-earth the sea-god himself appears to him, rising out of the ocean in the midst of a storm. In Gondolin he becomes great; he is wedded to Idril, Turgon’s daughter, and their son is Eärendel, whose birth and profound importance in days to come is foreseen by Ulmo.

At last comes the terrible ending. Morgoth learns through an act of supreme treachery all that he needs to mount a devastating attack on the city, with Balrogs and dragons and numberless Orcs. After a minutely observed account of the fall of Gondolin, the tale ends with the escape of Túrin and Idril, with the child Eärendel, looking back from a cleft in the mountains as they flee southward, at the blazing wreckage of their city. They were journeying into a new story, the Tale of Eärendel, which Tolkien never wrote, but which is sketched out in this book from other sources.

Following his presentation of Beren and Lúthien Christopher Tolkien has used the same ‘history in sequence’ mode in the writing of this edition of The Fall of Gondolin. In the words of J.R.R. Tolkien, it was ‘the first real story of this imaginary world’ and, together with Beren and Lúthien and The Children of Húrin, he regarded it as one of the three ‘Great Tales’ of the Elder Days.

Here it is! Third novel in the first age of Middle Earth.. Now I have written on a number of events that take place during this time and the links are as follows:

Middle Earth Challenge: Tom Bombadil

Middle Earth Challenge: The Children of Húrin

What Are The Origins Of The TROLLS? | History of Middle-Earth | Lore

The Fall of Gondolin was set into motion a few decades after the Nírnaeth Arnoediad (which is the fifth battle against morgoth in the first age of Middle Earth). Now keep in mind that the War of the Great Jewels (The Silmaril) went on for decades and decades. There were six great battles that took place:

First Battle – Fought mainly by Sindar(also known as the Grey Elves/Elves of telerin descent) against the Dark Lord Morgoth.

Dagor-nuin-Giliath – This wold the second battle, also known as the Battle Under the Stars. It was set in Beleriand(a region in the North West of Middle Earth) and first to be fought by exiled Ñoldor(the second clan of Elves, greatest of the Elves in lore and smithcraft.)

Dagor Aglareb – The third battle and the second battle in Beleriand. After the battle of Dagor-nuin-Giliath, there was a the beings of a civil war. But Morgoth began his attack and united the Elves and Men. This is also the first COMPLETE victory over Morgoth. This also made a period of the peace call Siege of Angband.

Dagor Bragollach – Also known as Battle of the Sudden Flame became the fourth greatest battle of the War of the Jewels. This is also the end of the Siege of Angband and the Dark Lord Morgoth took control over the war. This is also where Morgoth created the first Dragon. Morgoth’s army was in full swing with Orcs, Trolls, Balrogs and Glaurung(first dragon).

Nírnaeth Arnoediad – Or Battle of the Unnumbered Tears  is the fifth battle I was talking about in the beginning of this. Like I said before, the actions in the battle set forth the Fall of Gondolin and also the tragic history of Húrin. This battle saw a number of casualties on both sides. In the end Morgoth got the upper hand in the battle field of Anfauglith. The Failure of the Elves and Men of the Battle of Nírnaeth Arnoediad. Morgoth had destoryed all the people of Hithlum and his Orcs sacked Beleriand and forced the Sons of Fëanor away from Himring. This is also when Morgoth laid the curse upon Húrin and his kin, as well bound Húrin to a chair to watch the curse unfold before him. This is where the novel The Children of Húrin comes into play.

War of Wrath – Also called the Great Battle. Elves, Men, Dwarves and Valar all fought against Morgoth. This is now the end of the first age of Middle Earth and it is considered to be the largest battle of Middle Earth. The clashes between the forces of Valar & Morgoth was so violent, it broke apart the northwestern of Middle Earth and caused Beleriand to sink into the ocean.

But I feel that War of Wrath is set for another time. This is about the  Fall of Gondolin. While the novel itself does cover the War of Wrath, it was a rather short or at least it fell short. The Tale of Earendil is the highlight of the book. Sadly there are times within the novel it where is kinda lags. Where Christopher Tolkien goes into how his father wrote and the process he went through. While interesting to read, it kinda takes away from the book a little bit. But I am happy over all that these novels are finished and out there for everyone. It just make the Middle Earth bigger and more room for other stories to be told. But before reading these three novels, I say you have to read The Silmarillion first as it give you more insight into the history.

Middle Earth Challenge: The Tale of Tinúviel

Middle Earth Challenge

…It is a long tale…” — Aragorn

This one is a little different. As the The Tale of Tinúviel is really the first chapter in the novel The book of Lost Tales Vol. 2. I kinda felt I should write about this before the I write about Beren and Lúthien. Now the Book of Lost Tales Vol. 1 & 2, cover of events that happen in the first age of Middle Earth. They also go with the The Silmarillion to add support to the events and stories within that novel as well.

In the story of The Tale of Tinúviel it is the earliest version of Lúthien(but in this story she is named Tinúviel) writen by Tolkien in 1917. It’s a complex tale of the love between her and Beren and the quest/adventure they have to get the Silmaril. **Spoilers** it also tells the stories of the deaths of Finrod Felagund, Draugluin, Carcharoth, Huan (Beren’s wolf-hound), and the tragic death of Beren.

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Art work by https://www.deviantart.com/steamey

The Silmarils is the jewels of the Fëanor. Made with the essence of the two trees of Valinor. Said to be the most prized wonders that would made by the Elves. It was this that started the War of the Jewels and ended the first age of Middle Earth. Now much this tale is told again in the novel The Silmarillion as the epic poem The Lay of Leithian and it does not differ much. In the Lord of the Rings, Aragorn told Frodo of the story Beren and Lúthien. Plus the fact the both Aragorn and Arwen were both descendants of Beren and Lúthien.

It is also said that the tale of Aragorn and Arwen were to act a follow up to the Beren and Lúthien love story. So the themes are similar to each other and Tolkien also mirrored his relationship with his wife within these stories. In 2017 Christopher Tolkien wrote and worked on a 3 part series of the first age of Middle Earth. Beren and Lúthien became the first, taking the tales from Vol 1 & 2 and the works from the Silmarillion. Plus with the note from his father Christopher was able to make a book out of their quest.

Fun History Facts:

  • Tinúviel is only known by that name, which in this version is her given name and not an epithet given by Beren; the name Lúthien never appears.

  • Tevildo, “Prince of Cats”, is the precursor to the later character of Sauron.

  • Tinwelint was the name of the King of Artanor, who later would be changed to Thingol, King of Doriath.

  • Gwendeling was the name of Tinwelint’s wife, who later would be changed to the Maia Melian, Queen of Doriath.

  • Umuiyan is a character who is Tevildo’s doorkeeper.

  • Karkaras is the name of the beast-villain who later would be the wolf Carcharoth.

  • When Beren cuts the Silmaril from Melkor’s crown, he uses a kitchen-knife of Tevildo’s in this tale. Later, Angrist is what he uses instead.

  • Glorund the dragon is mentioned, who later becomes Glaurung.

  • Two named giants are mentioned, Nan and Gilim. In a certain song that Tinúviel sings, they are noted for their length of sword and height of neck, respectively. (Nan’s sword is said to be named Glend).

Middle Earth Challenge: The Hobbit

Middle Earth Challenge

“Bilbo Baggins was a hobbit who wanted to be left alone in quiet comfort. But the wizard Gandalf came along with a band of homeless Dwarves. Soon Bilbo was drawn into their quest, facing evil orcs, savage wolves, giant spiders, and worse unknown dangers. Finally, it was Bilbo–alone and unaided–who had to confront the great dragon Smaug, the terror of an entire countryside.”

20200328_1216016288655749656073878.jpg“Where did you go to, if I may ask?’ said Thorin to Gandalf as they rode along.
To look ahead,’ said he.
And what brought you back in the nick of time?’
Looking behind,’ said he.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit, or There and Back Again

This is not the first time I’ve read the The Hobbit, nor will it be the last. I can’t tell you how many times I have read it over the years. Between Middle School, High School and even as a bedtime story for my kids. This goes for all the stories of the Middle Earth. Unlike my Star Trek Challenge, where they were completely new adventures to me. Where I have love for some and hatred for others haha. The Middle Earth as a whole has been a love of mine for sometime now. I’ve always wanted to do a reading train on the novels for awhile and now that I have free time on my hands. I think I will.

Now I will odiously be going over the books of Middle Earth in this challenge. But to add a twist at the end I wanted to compare them to the movies. I know there is a number of people who love the movies and others who hate them, there really is no middle ground with them. I for one love them, over all I’m just happy I get to live in a time where they were made and done well . Not slapped together like the D&D movie…….

Now the The Hobbit is a much lighter tale then the LOTR trilogy. A lot of I believe is do to how Hobbits live and their views on life. It’s funny because I’m having a hard time writing a review for the book and explain my joy in this adventure. At it’s core it is an adventure novel, dare I say one of the most charming adventure stories ever told? Oh sure there are a few parts where it gets long winded, but it’s not as bad as George R.R. Martin.

Nowadays People have the good fortune of seeing Peter Jackson’s films, but I and many folks of an earlier generation recall the 1977 animated film with voice talent from John Huston, Orson Bean and Richard Boone. This cartoon was my first introduction to Tolkien’s work and would later lead me to read the Hobbit and Lord of the Rings. Thorin, the lead Dwarf and company leave from the Green Dragon, accompanied by the wizard Gandalf and employed Mr. Baggins as their lucky number 14 and as a burglar. And Bilbo’s unexpected adventure had begun.

Riddles in the Dark. After some fairly pedestrian undertakings Tolkien has Bilbo getting lost in a deep cave and introduces us to one of his strangely likeable villains, Gollum. Later readers would learn the deeper truths of his history, but Tolkien’s guests in this chapter see him as a eccentrically troubled scoundrel.

Songs. A reader in the twenty-first century, and especially one who has enjoyed the Jackson films, may discover that Tolkien’s original story was not as martial as the films. Jackson produced his Hobbit films to be less war-like than his LOTR films, but Tolkien’s prose contained a fair amount of poetry and song, casting his story. If you happen to find yourself a copy of this book, read it. It’s a charming novel that can stand by itself.

Now!! Lets get into the differences between the movies and the book:
i-feel-thinWow.. Okay after going over my notes I have realized this post will be come a small novel in itself. While there are a number of changes between the 1 book and the 3 movies hahaha. I feel that some had to be made.. A lot of people complained that there was to many changes or they just added random things in. When you read though the complains, they seem to be rather small. The Hobbit trilogy’s storyline draws on material from the appendices at the end of the Return of the King novel, especially Dwarven history and the White Council’s dealings with the Necromancer, who proves to be Sauron. As well as some elements of the The Silmarillion. While yes, there are a few parts in the movies where I found myself tilling my head going, “what?”. But I had a smile across my face and enjoyed the movies as a whole.

91VBFn334yL._RI_Now the 1977 animated production in most respects similar to the book. The criticism focused on adaptation issues, with unfamiliar style of artwork used by the Japanese-American co-production team. Tolkien fans questioned the appropriateness of repackaging the material as a family film for a very young audience. Douglas A. Anderson, a Tolkien scholar, called the adaptation “execrable” in his own introduction to the Annotated Hobbit, although he did not elaborate; and a few critics said it was confusing for those not already familiar with the plot. On the other hand, critics praised the adaptation as “excellent”, saying the work received “big points” for being “faithful to Tolkien’s story” and that the “vocal cast can’t be improved upon.” I myself loved this as a kid, the LOTR animated film left me going WTF? The Return of the King was good, from what I can remember.

 

​”I don’t know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve.”

 -J. R. R. Tolkien

Favorite quote of all time!

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​”I don’t know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve.”

 -J. R. R. Tolkien

Favorite quote of all time!

Star Wars And A Tolkien With A Side Of Forgotten Realms

Star Wars And A Tolkien With A Side Of Forgotten Realms

Star Wars: Death Troopers by Joe Schreiber….

6310782This novel is great on so many levels. I love Zombies and I love Star Wars. mix the two together and you get this! Plus mix in some of my favorite characters into the story line and SQUEEEEE!

Great book from begin to end. Rather quick too… I think the best way to describe the book was this quote from a review I found from  fellow reader on Goodreads…

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Star Wars And A Tolkien With A Side Of Forgotten Realms

Star Wars And A Tolkien With A Side Of Forgotten Realms

Star Wars: Death Troopers by Joe Schreiber….

6310782This novel is great on so many levels. I love Zombies and I love Star Wars. mix the two together and you get this! Plus mix in some of my favorite characters into the story line and SQUEEEEE!

Great book from begin to end. Rather quick too… I think the best way to describe the book was this quote from a review I found from  fellow reader on Goodreads…

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Star Wars And A Tolkien With A Side Of Forgotten Realms

Star Wars: Death Troopers by Joe Schreiber….

6310782This novel is great on so many levels. I love Zombies and I love Star Wars. mix the two together and you get this! Plus mix in some of my favorite characters into the story line and SQUEEEEE!

Great book from begin to end. Rather quick too… I think the best way to describe the book was this quote from a review I found from  fellow reader on Goodreads about the this book:

Like an unconcerned lover, meeting you for a “nooner”, Death Troopers is quick and dirty. it doesn’t ask you how you are doing or if you are getting close. When it is finished, it rolls out of bed and leaves you staring, asking “what exactly just happened”. You feel a little dirty, then you shower and get back to work. in the end, it is still a nooner, so who can scoff at that? Not I.

I thought this was a perfect way to sum up the book HAHAHA! the writing is on spot and action flows smoothly (for zombies that is). Keep the classic Star Wars universe intact as well, without having to change anything. Plus you don’t need to know anything before reading this book. Just pick it up and run with it. I highly recommend it to everyone who is a Star Wars fanboy or a lover of the zombie world! The story plot of Death Troopers is:

When the Imperial prison barge Purge—temporary home to five hundred of the galaxy’s most ruthless killers, rebels, scoundrels, and thieves—breaks down in a distant part of space, its only hope appears to lie with a Star Destroyer found drifting and seemingly abandoned. But when a boarding party from the Purge is sent to scavenge for parts, only half of them come back—bringing with them a horrific disease so lethal that within hours nearly all aboard the Purge die in ways too hideous to imagine.

And death is only the beginning.

The Purge’s half-dozen survivors will do whatever it takes to stay alive. But nothing can prepare them for what lies waiting aboard the Star Destroyer. For the dead are rising: soulless, unstoppable, and unspeakably hungry.

————

20151017_121439Early today I got my copy of J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Children of Hurin!!! Can’t wait till I can get into this book! I’ve been looking forward for awhile now. So a little birthday gift to myself by the way. from what I’m told, I’m able to buy myself anymore gifts. Because other people are getting me stuff. 😉

It is a legendary time long before The Lord of the Rings, and Morgoth, the first Dark Lord, dwells in the vast fortress of Angband in the North; and within the shadow of the fear of Angband, and the war waged by Morgoth against the Elves, the fates of Túrin and his sister Niënor will be tragically entwined.

Their brief and passionate lives are dominated by the elemental hatred that Morgoth bears them as the children of Húrin, the man who dared to defy him to his face. Against them Morgoth sends his most formidable servant, Glaurung, a powerful spirit in the form of a huge wingless dragon of fire, in an attempt to fulfil the curse of Morgoth, and destroy the children of Húrin.

Begun by J.R.R. Tolkien at the end of the First World War, The Children of Húrin became the dominant story in his later work on Middle-earth. But he could not bring it to a final and finished form. In this book Christopher Tolkien has constructed, after long study of the manuscripts, a coherent narrative without any editorial invention.

But this book looks great and I’m really wondering what Morgoth is going to be like :). I’ve read the history of middle earth and some of the short /lost tales. So I have an idea on whats going to go down in this book.

20151002_203239I also picked up a trilogy, thanks to my soon to be wife Carly. Called The Hunter’s Blades trilogy By R.A. Salvatore. I love his books and read a lot of them. But I don’t think I can read all of them lol.. the man has written so much! But I love the Forgotten Realms series and the work that Salvatore brings to the table.

Continues the adventures of the Dark Elf hero, Drizzt Do’Urden, as an invasion of orcs sweeps across the Spine of the World, separating him from the friends on whom he has long relied and forcing him to draw on his own inner resources.